Arlo|Smart Home Security|Wireless HD Security Cameras

Radio Frequency emmited by the Alro pro base alarm?

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Aldawgs
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Hey all,

 

I have recently purchased a Trifield EMF meter and had noticed that the Arlo Base Station had admitted a lot of Radio Frequency spikes but have no idea if these are considered to be a safe level, or if running such device for a extent peroid of time near a bedroom or family room for a long duration would cause health affects over time?

 

I had recordered a video demonstrating the spikes with the device been connected / disconnected and connected to show the meters response.

 

 

 

 

Model: VMB3000 | Arlo Base Station
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StephenB
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@jguerdat wrote:

Don't forget that the base is essentially a stripped down WiFi router so will emit a 2.4GHz signal as needed.


Yes.  And the WiFi remains within the power limits established in your country assuming you purchased the version for your country, and didn't get it somewhere else (US: EIRP < 36 dBm).  So it is as safe as putting a router or extender in that location.

 

As far as health/RF exposure goes, the health standards for access points assume that there is at least 20 cm distance between the transmitter and people.  It'd be wise to maintain that distance (and exposure drops very rapidly as the distance increases).

 

There are a couple of studies done on this.  One I found was done by the Canadian Govt (linked below).  If you scroll down to the conclusion, you'll see that they found:

 

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf10385.html#s32 wrote:

Based on the results of this case study, the aggregated RF exposure of multiple Wi-Fi access points and Wi-Fi-enabled devices in this indoor location was well below the SC6 [safety] limits. In addition, the Wi-Fi access points selected for this study were operating at higher power compared with the majority of the Wi-Fi devices currently available on the Canadian market. Therefore, the results of this study are likely higher than typical equivalent setups in public and private environments, such as homes, schools and businesses.


 

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jguerdat
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Guru

Don't forget that the base is essentially a stripped down WiFi router so will emit a 2.4GHz signal as needed.

StephenB
Guru Guru
Guru

@jguerdat wrote:

Don't forget that the base is essentially a stripped down WiFi router so will emit a 2.4GHz signal as needed.


Yes.  And the WiFi remains within the power limits established in your country assuming you purchased the version for your country, and didn't get it somewhere else (US: EIRP < 36 dBm).  So it is as safe as putting a router or extender in that location.

 

As far as health/RF exposure goes, the health standards for access points assume that there is at least 20 cm distance between the transmitter and people.  It'd be wise to maintain that distance (and exposure drops very rapidly as the distance increases).

 

There are a couple of studies done on this.  One I found was done by the Canadian Govt (linked below).  If you scroll down to the conclusion, you'll see that they found:

 

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf10385.html#s32 wrote:

Based on the results of this case study, the aggregated RF exposure of multiple Wi-Fi access points and Wi-Fi-enabled devices in this indoor location was well below the SC6 [safety] limits. In addition, the Wi-Fi access points selected for this study were operating at higher power compared with the majority of the Wi-Fi devices currently available on the Canadian market. Therefore, the results of this study are likely higher than typical equivalent setups in public and private environments, such as homes, schools and businesses.


 

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