Arlo|Smart Home Security|Wireless HD Security Cameras
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nicholshornlake
Luminary
Luminary

Motion detection is always too late, or not at all

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Gil100
Tutor
Tutor
We got the set you sell at Costco. We positioned the camera overlooking the entrance to the house, while it usually detect the moment by the time it starts recording the person is already at the door and the video is useless.
In addition it does recognize my 14 years old but not my shorter 11. I've chaged the sensativity to 100% and it still doesn't catch her
theaskanison
Aspirant
Aspirant
If you got it at Costco I suggest retuning it. It won't get better.
Gil100
Tutor
Tutor
More details, the movment is from the side. There is no place to define the length of the video, and it basically looks like the device wakes up too late
theaskanison
Aspirant
Aspirant
Underneath the screen where you modify the motion setting you can modify the recording length. And yes, this camera sucks because it doesn' t seem to have motion detectors near the lens. So it get trigger by the tired of passing cars but not by the people who walk to your front door
Gil100
Tutor
Tutor
That screen you mention doesn't exist in my app. Other than percentage I can't do a lot about the video at all
jguerdat
Guru Guru
Guru

A lot of misinformation being disseminated here.

 

The PIR senors are very near the lens and are very visible.  However, they are passive IR sensors so understanding how they work is key to understanding how they will detect motion.  A quick Google will give you tons of info.

 

Many times the issue is too much scene to be effective.  Passing acrs should generally not even be in the field of view - rotate the camera down or choose a different location.  PIR sensors detect best when motion is across the FOV, not directly to/from the camera. Also, people detection is maxed out at about 20 feet or so, unlike cars which reflect the sun's IR like crazy. Position and aim the camera so you only have the actual area of interest - don't go for a wide, all-inclusive view.

 

Sometimes, a good position is just flat hard to locate due to what's available to mount the camera on.  In those cases, a couple of cameras from different angles can be useful, especially if you use nested rules (camera A detects and B records and vice versa).  SInce part of the above here is about finding settings, I'd recommend reading the various FAQs here which have a ton of info on creating and modifying modes and rules as well as camera positioning.  Briefly, though, modes and rules are found in the Mode tab.  You should go through the whole interface to see what's available.

 

When in the mode tab, you'll see your base. Click on it and you'll see your modes (Armed and Disarmed) as well as the schedule and geofencing (if using the app).  Edit the Armed mode using the pencil or > icon on the right and check it out.  All settings for all cameras are in there.  However, you don't have full control over this mode because it's a basic mode to get you started as well as to provide a troubleshooting tool.  If this mode is all you need, change settings, being sure to save at every opportunity.  

 

If you need more control, create your own custom modes. The FAQs step you through this but you create a mode and add one camera rule to it.  To add more cameras, save and reedit it. Any camera WITHOUT a rule is disarmed.

 

When done creating/modifying modes, maybe use the schedule to automatic switching.

 

Practice makes perfect. Trial and error is also needed to customize to your particular environment and needs.  Use small steps and monitor progress.