Arlo|Smart Home Security|Wireless HD Security Cameras

Re: Easy to take camera apart and solder leads to power camera using AC adapter?

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Sincity Guide
Guide

Has anyone taken a camera apart? Is it easy? Since AC power is not an option, I'd like to convert one. Would a USB powersupply supply enough voltage/amperage?


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JamesC Community Manager
Community Manager

As a reminder for those involved in this discussion, NETGEAR does not recommend using Arlo Wire-free cameras in this way. Powering the camera using alternative methods (micro-usb or otherwise) may result in damage to the camera and void the warranty

 

NETGEAR recommends users always power Arlo Wire-free cameras using CR123 lithium 3-volt batteries. For more information, see here: What kind of batteries does my Arlo Wire-Free camera use?

 

Thank you,

JamesC

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buckorange Star
Star

I currently have two of my four cameras running on a 12 volt dc 1.5 amp power supply. These cameras were located close to 110 outlets, so I couldn't see why these needed battery power. It's easily done. I don't know why netgear didn't make that a option. It would have been better for sales. They still could make that camera with both options included in one single camera. The batteries 3 volt, 4 each at 12 volts, operating range is between 800 to 2000 mAh, current stays the same. Need a power supply of 12 volts and between .8 to 2.0 amps would work. The batteries run at 1500 mAh so I would use a 1.5 amp power supply. The cameras power goes through at the bottom of the battery location, not on the sliding lid location. You need to solder at least two locations, postive, and negative. Make sure your wired postive power supply lead to postive, negative to negative  locations. You need to run a jumper wire across both locations, diagonal from positive to postive, and negative to negative also. This will show you full battery power on the camera display. If you only wire power and ground to just two terminals it will only show two bars on battery power display. Hope this is a helpful hint to someone who is handy.Arlo outside.jpg

buckorange Star
Star

Just wanted to add that in the previous reply I did drill a hole through the side of the camera to run the female dc power plug socket jack connector. I drilled more toward the back and approximately 1/4 inch down from the battery cover sliding lid. I wanted to stay away from the battery lid cause you still have the option of converting it back to batteries, and just plugging the hole, and the lid area needs to be left alone for it to set on a flat surface. The particular socket I purchase came with positive, negative wires attached. I put silicon caulking to keep it sealed tight from moisture. I read in one of the replies a person said this was a 6 volt system, it is a 12 volt system, and www.Gearhack.com confirmed it, and they have other specs on the camera system too. The 12 volt 1.5 amp power supply can be bought through amazon or eBay. It was less than $14. The female dc power plug socket jack connector with 6 inches of wire can be bought at Amazon and eBay also, less that $10 for like for a dozen. I also bought a dc power supply extension cord with the male and female ends attached. They make those in various lengths. I purchase a 16 foot for $15. Just be sure all your connections are the standard dc power supply 2.1 mm x 5.5 mm connectors. I'm sure any modifications to the camera will void any warranty. If you decide to do this be patient and be sure you double check that you have your wire leads right. I checked mine out with a multimeter to be sure. I had more pictures and images but this format won't let me attach them, sorry. 

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Sincity Guide
Guide

Brilliant! Thanks for your answer. These things also seem to run on 5V using the micro-USB port under the rubber seal. Another user said that long-term may burn it out.

jimmyzshack Guide
Guide

yea you could probably just drill a hole in the battery compartment and use the micro usb and water proof the new opening with the wire going in. Don't know if i'll do it, as i have had other IP camera's and the main problem has always been the power supplies going out.

buckorange Star
Star

These power supplies are pretty cheap. If you can get two years out of just one your ahead of changing out batteries at the cost of four per camera. I have power supplies on other electronics I have and I have never had any of them give me problems. It's all made in china, anything can happen. The true test is time.

rajthepi Aspirant
Aspirant

Hi 

 

Are you able to show pictures for the connection or vedio tuour for the DIY work please.

 

It will help us to make ower power supply.

 

Tx

Raj

nzraj@yahoo.co.nz

+64220923456

 

Tulley Apprentice
Apprentice
Yeah I would like to know how to connect up 12v. I am a litte uncertain as these cameras do run off just two batteries meaning 6V. This makes me think its two 6v in parallel but appently you have it running on 12v. Can these devices just be extremely flexible?!
Guru TomMac Guru
Guru

Tulley wrote:
Yeah I would like to know how to connect up 12v. I am a litte uncertain as these cameras do run off just two batteries meaning 6V. This makes me think its two 6v in parallel but appently you have it running on 12v. Can these devices just be extremely flexible?!

Going to say again, these Cameras are not 12v... they are 6v. ( actually 6.4v as the OEM cells new are 3.2v each ) Don't believe everything written on the internet.

 

 

First, the original day cam ( never sold ) used only 2 batteries due to lack of draw for IR illuminators. You can also run the IR cam on two cells perfectly but for less time than 4 as they are 2 sets in parrellel to double the available current ( usage time ).

 

Second , the fact you can feed it 12v just means that the components can handle the higer voltage and don't forget there is a good voltage drop with DC over a run of wire ( based on gauge and lenght ).

 

As to the input voltage, using 3.7v rechargables, they can be as high as 4.2v+ off charge so the Arlo cams accept 8.4v without problem ( netgear has stated these cells will not damage the cams )

 

If you want to do the mods listed, that is up to you, but for long term I would stay closer to the designed input voltage if able

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buckorange Star
Star

I would say there is a varible range of voltage on the Arlo camera. You read about some of the recharble batteries some people are using, and there like almost 1.5 volt higher output per battery. I do realize the current loss running longer power cable. The picture I posted of the camera has roughly 25 feet of cable. So I used a 12 volt 2000 mAh, transformer in that location, being your regular batteries are running at 1500 mAh. The other camera I have has only four feet of cable so I used a 12 volt 1500 mAh transformer. I haven't had any issues with the conversion. No problems. I tryed to post more pictures, but not easy on this site, with the size, volume. Just remember don't always believe what you read on the internet, that probably can be said about this site too. My conversion was just, to share another alternative, and make the Arlo camera more versatile.

seggreeses Tutor
Tutor

Here is my mod.

 

Only need a 6V 2A adapter and 2 clips per camera.

 

After the modification there was a big rain for 3 hours, and the camera is perfectly rain proof. The motion detection and the recording is perfectly working.

 

 

IMG_20151114_141331.jpg

IMG_20151114_141339.jpg

IMG_20151114_143621.jpg

Guru TomMac Guru
Guru

buckorange wrote:

I would say there is a varible range of voltage on the Arlo camera. You read about some of the recharble batteries some people are using, and there like almost 1.5 volt higher output per battery. I do realize the current loss running longer power cable. The picture I posted of the camera has roughly 25 feet of cable. So I used a 12 volt 2000 mAh, transformer in that location, being your regular batteries are running at 1500 mAh. The other camera I have has only four feet of cable so I used a 12 volt 1500 mAh transformer. I haven't had any issues with the conversion. No problems. I tryed to post more pictures, but not easy on this site, with the size, volume. Just remember don't always believe what you read on the internet, that probably can be said about this site too. My conversion was just, to share another alternative, and make the Arlo camera more versatile.



BTW, I like out of the box thinking... so don't think i was poo-poo'ing the change over.

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Morse is faster than texting!
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Schorschi Prodigy
Prodigy

 


buckorange wrote:

So I used a 12 volt 2000 mAh, transformer in that location, being your regular batteries are running at 1500 mAh. The other camera I have has only four feet of cable so I used a 12 volt 1500 mAh transformer.


Careful with your units and deductions here.

 

mAh is a measure of capacity. What you meant is mA maximum current for your power adapters.

 

And you can't really compare a battery's capacity with the maximum amperage of a power adapter. I.e. a battery with 1500 mAh capacity does not provide (a maximum) current at 1500 mA.

Bhewit Aspirant
Aspirant

I have a camera set on order and like the idea of eliminating the batteries and hard wiring as shown in this thread.  My question is do these cameras need to be re-synced every time the battery is changed?  If so then hard wiring the cameras power creates syncing issues since the cameras would be plugged in a long way from the base station.  (Does my concern make sense?)

Guru TomMac Guru
Guru

Bhewit wrote:

I have a camera set on order and like the idea of eliminating the batteries and hard wiring as shown in this thread.  My question is do these cameras need to be re-synced every time the battery is changed?  If so then hard wiring the cameras power creates syncing issues since the cameras would be plugged in a long way from the base station.  (Does my concern make sense?)


If in a good range to the base, when batteries are changed they will auto re-sync... no button pushing required

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buckorange Star
Star

I agree with TomMac. No issues with auto reset if your within range of the base station. I occasionally unplug my cameras that run on the power supply and they automatically reset.

Bhewit Aspirant
Aspirant

Thanks for the replies.  Another question, did you install an in-line fuse for each camera and if so what current rating?

buckorange Star
Star

Bhewit wrote:

Thanks for the replies.  Another question, did you install an in-line fuse for each camera and if so what current rating?


No, I did not install an in-line fuse. Possibly not a bad idea though. I guess the question is what amp rating will your transformer be. The fuse would have to be a little higher than your transformer amp output, or you would keep taking out your fuse. That's my best guess.

Bhewit Aspirant
Aspirant

If it is a 6v 2 amp power supply that doesn't mean the camera is pulling 2 amps.  I would expect less than 1 amp but don't really know.  So a fuse would be somewhere between what the camera draws and the 2 amps.   Don't know what the resistance of the camera circuitry is.

buckorange Star
Star

Was just thinking once you have your DC transformer and you wire it without the fuse first. If you can get your hands on a clamp-on Amp Meter, or know someone who has one. Separate your two wires and clamp around the positive wire and measure your amp usage at start up (first turning on the camera through the Auto reset and the running amperage with camera running). What ever is the highest, I would select a fuse 1/2 to 1 amp higher. Would be better than just guessing. Just a suggestion.

buckorange Star
Star

Bhewit wrote:

If it is a 6v 2 amp power supply that doesn't mean the camera is pulling 2 amps.  I would expect less than 1 amp but don't really know.  So a fuse would be somewhere between what the camera draws and the 2 amps.   Don't know what the resistance of the camera circuitry is.


If you decide to measure the amperage with a clamp-on meter, please post your results. There are a lot of curious minds including mine, and it would give us an average of what these cameras are running at with amperage using a transformer.

Bhewit Aspirant
Aspirant

Unfortunately I don't have access to an ammeter.

Tulley Apprentice
Apprentice

Is fusing such low wattage stuff really necessary? I would think the fused power supply itself would protect you from any significant surges or faults... you're probably talking about half an amp at 6v on a camera thats demonstrated it works at 12v so i think there is margin.

If the dc supply is a chinese piece of crap with no fuse or protection at all. Then I would consider a 2A fuse...maybe im talking crap, im only a mechanical engineer. That arcing bright stuff isnt my specialism.

buckorange Star
Star

Tulley wrote:

Is fusing such low wattage stuff really necessary? I would think the fused power supply itself would protect you from any significant surges or faults... you're probably talking about half an amp at 6v on a camera thats demonstrated it works at 12v so i think there is margin.

If the dc supply is a chinese piece of crap with no fuse or protection at all. Then I would consider a 2A fuse...maybe im talking crap, im only a mechanical engineer. That arcing bright stuff isnt my specialism.


I can relate to what your saying. Apples & oranges, horseshoes or hand grenades. I probably wouldn't fuse my current installation. I'm just curious now to see what the current is running for amperage. I'm not a spark chaser by trade, just a retired Military Jet Engine Mechanic for thirty years. I'll try and get to testing it sometime this week. Gives me something to do.

Guru jguerdat Guru
Guru

You could wire a low resistance resistor, such as 1 ohm, in series with the feed and measure the voltage drop with a voltmeter. I=E/R or plug in the values here:

 

http://www.onlineconversion.com/ohms_law.htm