Arlo|Smart Home Security|Wireless HD Security Cameras

Any progress regarding pixel based motion detection on Pro 2?

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mpjh
Tutor
Tutor

OK, got it now (after spending the sorry money) the Pro 2 will not work through a glass window for motion detection because you can never, never get only pixel based motion detection (IR is always on). What a sorry mess, panasonic cameras from 25 years ago worked through glass and you controled false indication with fields and sensitivity. Progess hey?

AncientGeek
Hero
Hero

@mpjh wrote:

OK, got it now (after spending the sorry money) the Pro 2 will not work through a glass window for motion detection because you can never, never get only pixel based motion detection (IR is always on). What a sorry mess, panasonic cameras from 25 years ago worked through glass and you controled false indication with fields and sensitivity. Progess hey?


Arlo Q uses image based motion detection.  Battery cameras use PIR likely for power conservation.  Not a mistake, just a known trade-off to achieve wire free operation.

mpjh
Tutor
Tutor

You're confused. The Pro 2 only uses pixel detection when plugged into a power source. So the problem is not a trade off for batter operation, just an engineering glich (or worse a corporate decision for cloud usage reasons). The IR detection stays on all the time regardless battery or AC operation.

jguerdat
Guru Guru
Guru

Nope. The P2 uses the PIR to detect motion and then uses the pixel detection to determine whether it's in a zone. You can test this by placing the camera behind a window and try to trigger motion from outdoor.

mpjh
Tutor
Tutor

Another fox channel groupie. No evidence-based facts, only corporate defender based on supposition. IR doesn't work through modern glass. So your explanation is just made up from whole cloth. If you want pixel detection to work through glass, you need to turn of the IR as the primary movement detector. IP cameras did that in the 1990s without any trouble. Problem is that they were sensitive to any movement - tree leaves, swings, wing blowing lamps, etc. and today's arlo cloud would fill up with inexperienced users getting too many false hits. The field control can prevent this, but Arlo has decided we aren't smart enough to learn how your elders did it in the 90s, so no pixel detection through glass. A step back in technology. It is the dumb down syndrone of the millenials.

AncientGeek
Hero
Hero

@mpjh wrote:

Another fox channel groupie. No evidence-based facts, only corporate defender based on supposition. IR doesn't work through modern glass. So your explanation is just made up from whole cloth. If you want pixel detection to work through glass, you need to turn of the IR as the primary movement detector. IP cameras did that in the 1990s without any trouble. Problem is that they were sensitive to any movement - tree leaves, swings, wing blowing lamps, etc. and today's arlo cloud would fill up with inexperienced users getting too many false hits. The field control can prevent this, but Arlo has decided we aren't smart enough to learn how your elders did it in the 90s, so no pixel detection through glass. A step back in technology. It is the dumb down syndrone of the millenials.


Your response is rude and inappropriate for this (or any) community.  We are fellow users attempting to share our knowledge to help others use these systems.  A number of us are your age and definitely seekers of fact based knowledge.  We also try to be respectful of others in our communications even when we are incredibly frustrated with these systems.

 

In order to do pixel motion detection, the camera needs to be on.  That is great for a camera powered from a wall socket.  Arlo does that with the Arlo Q series.  Arlo originally built the wire free series to be used exclusively wirelessly, so they made a design decision to use IR motion detection on that platform to save power.  They evolved that platform to use rechargeable batteries and eventually have more functionality when continuously powered.  For whatever reason, they chose not to add pixel motion detection as one of those functions that is available when the “wire free” cameras are powered continuously.  We are not defending Arlo’s technology decisions.  We are just relaying our experience with them.

 

Arlo does do pixel analysis in their Smart notifications, but that is not motion detection.  It is motion analysis on cloud servers.  The motion trigger is PIR.  The video is sent to the cloud servers where it is analyzed and appropriate notifications are then sent to users.

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